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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  September 7, 2017 3:00am-6:00am PDT

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time but it looks like it could be something that could be no good. believe me, not good. >> good morning. it is thursday, september 7th. welcome to morning joe. with us veteran columnist and nbc contributor mike barnicle, mark halperin, jim vandehei and in washington, at "usa today" pryzbyla. i have to call my daughter. we're going to get to the major hurricane headed towards florida in just a moment. but first, what happened yesterday politically? give as you quick read. >> donald trump did yesterday we were been saying for two years he'd be most natural doing. he dealt with nancy pelosi and chuck schumer than paul ryan and
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mitch mcconnell. we said that before he stepped in the white house because it's true. he contributed to schumer and he understands pelosi. we saw him strike a deal that's very bad for conservatives and very bad for republicans. it's very good for donald trump, it's very good for democrats and i guaranteed you if you polled americans, most would be glad they put off a debt krelg crisis for three months and he funded them again harvey. republicans are going to have to get the votes and understand what we said yesterday on this show, donald trump's going to deal with democrats and that's exactly what he did. >> we're going to break that down in just a moment. but first, reports of devastation coming in in the wake of hurricane irma.
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the france's interior minister said the storm has led at least eight dead 90% of the island's structures are reportedly damaged or destroyed. today irma is expected to graze the republican and good morning to you, mika. well stg, and until that changes. >> needs to take this as serious as they ever had. like with andrew and even that was about 25 years ago. so currently the storm north of the dominican republic, it's still a category 5, 180 mile-per-hour winds. it looks like it has peaked from
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intensity. no watches in the u.s. yet but those will be coming out later today. here's the new forecast path from the hurricane center, they take it right through to florida straits, 150 mile-an-hour winds. 2 a.m. sunday is when the worst should be arriving in south florida and then a worst case scenario right up through miami, fort lauderdale and west palm beach and category 2 or 3 into south carolina line a. category 4s are 250 times worse. we still have the european mod es. we still have about 60 hours it will be on her. >> now to politics.
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seven months in highs presidency, donald trump has reloud the art of the deal, it, agreed to a plan bringing hurricane harvey relief, a three-month period of relief and it gives democrats leverage, force it would go unpopular debt ceiling's votes instead of just one. the democrats put out a news release call for for a three-month funding bishl which got an icy reception from paul ryan. >> reporter: seem like they're trying to ek tract something of the d.r.e.a.mers. >> i think that's a ridiculous idea. let hope they don't mean this. weep have all this devastation in texas and they want to play
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politics with the debt ceiling. i think it's relouse and diplomacy a. republicans argued first for an 18 debt limit hike. then they offered section months, which the pans, are multiple sources had mitch mcconnell insisted, they would have added a three-month federal agent. it had and the meeting careened off topic. a white house aide says the president but the ben dominic
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wrote "the pivot is neal and it's spectacular. >> we had a great meeting with chuck schumer, nancy pelosi and the whole republican leadership group. i'll tell you what, we walked out thereof, mitch and paul and everybody, kevin and woo walked out and everybody was happy. no too happy because you can never be too happy but they were happy enough. >> so it was a really good moment of some bipartisanship and getting things done, no one standing in their corner. we democrats, you know, some people just don't help at all, particularly on debt ceiling but we thought for the good of the country we should make the right offer. the senate and house democrat
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and a debt ceiling into december. >> were you surprise that the president sided with democrats? >> the president can speak for himself, but his feeling was that thee at a time genuine national crisis. that was the rational. >> so, joe, break down what happened. it feel like tiend if and then they had the ivanka element or is there anything to pb you saw donald trump. he was able to do something he hasn't been able to do for the
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first and a half and a half months of we've averted a debt crisis where the united states defaults on its debts. there was a lot of chaos this fall. we pushed this off till the end of the year. we also have funded hurricane harvey. and i'm sure that was a real driver for this final decision, but just look at it. mark halperin, you said it yesterday, donald trump's in box is massive. he has so much to do. and he's looking around the room and he's looking at mike pence, everybody said oh, mike pence is great on capitol hill. >> he doesn't know how to work.
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>> they failed at repealing obamacare. in seven and a half months, they failed it passing other things. and, yes, donald trump helped them spectacularlyly in failing. . you're never going to pass things as long as mark meadows and a mall faction. >>. we're going to roll you and we'll find for seven or mother democrats. he's got another category 5 storming towards miami and south florida. that's going to be another relief bill he has to get done.
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he got all of these other things in front of him. there's no way he was going to get it done with the republicans. this is horrible for the conservative party, it's horrible for the republican party. most people like the fact that they finally got something donen. about i agree with you. in the short term, not having a d disthe president has to make a deal on daca. if the president has a mouk a deal on funding the affordable chair act -- and if all this deal crowds out any possible pb
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but -- yeah. >> but, mark, first of all, they can pay me double because yesterday i said that -- >> you did. you were like karnack. >> like karnack. and by the way, is the cost of darj for d.a.c. oonchts and do po and now this all assumes that donald trump's pivot is is going to watch 12 hours. i'm sure it will tweet and
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destroy any gapes he made yesterday afternoon. because they'll be ataking on "fox & friends" momentarily. but if it's blows. but he's now left on the short term, no happiness on the right. is he able to build a slow conclusion. >> will in one of the most spectacular rhett tore california twists are ul.
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-- yes. we all andpaul ryan is more upset about this i'm sure than anybody. trumpers are going to follow donald trump no matter what he does. so if he's doing deals with democrats, that he will mae frn we know what's happening there. trump is going in for the hug. priz bella, there's an easy john of the match have does have the
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treasury secretary steve merrill lynch chin, thinking this is a toto on and it's always going to go within way er er to ps after on tv. they were surprised as the press did. in is the monday who mack. . donald trump craves. he got a deal done. >> exactly. and i think this is just prsk and in terms of. and i dare to say i think joe is
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right, that even trumps are frrmgs are not doing the tea party two stop of wanting to ground in the back drop. want to see each it workpb bad position going forward. we will find out whether trump is able to go ahead and cut those deals with democrats on dak in border security. cutting a discussing that money. >> mike barnicle. >> with all due respect to mark hall principle, who i think is in the middle of concussion
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syndrome. >> well, you know. >> jnl, he lefs for the headline, for the came hour. he wins for the personal. the political personal. he will do anything to achieve momentary a wepjim, you've covered the heal in that this f continuing resolutions fafrp for be. the rab can dwrsh pfrm ffrmt
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can't think of a single conservative voter who a year ago would say, yeah from conservative. they were elected in those lebss in 2010 saying we're going it reduce the size of government sfrrnlt nothing necessarily is what it appears to this isn't an interview where he rambles off and walk into the p and mott nn
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we -- americans will see this as washington finally getting something done. they're going to provide relief for harvey. and they're going do-to-do it quickly and it's going to be significant. he has aremembered $ percent merps want hem to do, with a, pi is to do a lo prrk, from. mr. mcto flam nm he hasn't tried working with thos people. i don't think a he's done -- i mean, look at under this picture of trumpinging a.
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ut, in rns a next minute it come plootly changes. >> i'm talking about votes. >> okay. . >> no, no, but i'm hadmoney and all right, donald trump took care of them el nm pretty pretty incredible how much msh did dones did spite the fact that on 18% of americans imported. my point is this, though, jim,
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paul ryan can't control his on caucus. mr. been able to get 50.5 percentages and said i'm going to get something done. he dealt with the democrats all pr and the democrats pmt sfrm but for americans, they've going to be get rid some pretty complex issues. based on everything i've seen when working with the guy they consider kryptonite. the on way it would work is if he really moved radically to the far left, which i don't think he's prepared to do. so, yes, it works in the short
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term. it might work in dark an. if you have all party rule, to me you're still in a much better position figuring out do you leverage the fact that you put the whole stinking government and you were put there with mandate to change government. >> they don't control the -- they don't control entire government. >> they control a big ol' check of it. >> because i did sfwrrj sfwrrj it's not mitch mcconnell's fault
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the world is changed in. snm in at this one. 12 pmt nncht dprmt that's just the political reality in washington, d.c. still heart on nchblt staff nt view f and rab congressman tom cole on reports of a brewle prm
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we'll be right back. >> i just want to thank you for your bravery. and your balls. been -- could you get a background on them for your tuesday at thisjust ask sfrnks
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sfrb that pain could mean something worse. >> embrel hopefully it will nshl if. fch snchl sflfrp snchl who f on the approved for over 18 years. so that you can spend time on what really matters.
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oh, well, hello there. at 26 past the hour. >> hi. >> oh. i thought we were going to willie. the reaction among republicans to everything that happened yesterday was disbelief, joe. why do you think it was so public? or was it planned? >> well, i don't know but i wanted to go to willie and mike on this about -- i mean, let's talk about, guys, the long-term effect of this. willie, i start with you. i know that paul ryan and mitch mcconnell are upset at what
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happened yesterday but now paul ryan can go to the freedom caucus in meadows and go "i need your vote." and if i don't get it, nancy pelosi and chuck schumer are going to write this bill and not you. so do you want 100% or would you rather have 90% of the republican bill? could that be a long-term positive effect for republicans? >> it's a long-term positive way to look at it. they say it put the democrats in the driver's seat. they've been out of the white house, out of the house and power and out of leadership well. it's possible that paul ryan could use this as a leadership point.
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ben sachs said, "senate sass day. congressman simpson said why not do a daily bet sealer? he's got a book out, end of tweet. a little more along with whaef mitch mcconnell would have to d doo, quote, the president of the united states just handed a loaded gun to the president and schumer. the president, quote, agreed to the deal to clear the deck for tax reform. >> reporter: some republicans on
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capitol hill say he defied the party by striking a deal with democrats. how do you respond to that? >> that is just false. there is no deal struck with democrats. this is on behalf of the american people. >> but there are democrats. >> donald trump is a consummate deal maker. what it means for people in washington living and working in the swamp for too long, they're not used to getting the pace of president trump to get things done. >> i showed people yesterday that people who voted for obama and trump, were. >> what does this do? doesn't this move some of those people back? what's your great teakaway from pivot, even if it's if it's a long-term pivot. long terp to drot is lunch today. it's been movie noontime.
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and we think the mace being if you view donald trump from the outside, i think you get a much better picture of what happened yesterday. joe, you've used the phrase he's a day trader multiple times. tease what he is. he was day trading dret on the board. he hasn't had one yet. i think we underestimate the impab of the thuns down by justice department and the loss of the owe baum for hk at the end of the day who is president of the united states, who is in it for himself primarily, to get
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a vick trim for himself to be able to boast in north dakota that he knows how to cut deals. he just did the view of trump from the outside. >> and all you have to do is listen to kellyanne there. he got a deal done, not done in a conventional way that the typical have to get with democrats. what does this do to joe's earlier point about ryan. where do you go now? >> you're feeling pretty disenfranchised going forward. even though going forward, now what's going to happen to next week of before too song. what is going to happen about a
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marriage of these convenients with these democrats or whether this pore trands a lot of long way bench fwrb so the bare minimum of what we need to do is keep our frunds funded. if the president feels he's going to play an outside role in instance. we're going to make this a middle class clm who people but keeping the government funded and say, high, hill it will here
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to in nrm and he's got nor hurricane coming this way. i, again, i think i'm a loan here in athe one thing i can't afford is for the government to shut down while i'm yug grrk rng snrnl over the next two very chaotic months, over the next month, month and a half. i do think that's significant but, again, i could be wrong. i could be sitting here alone. i want to go back to the
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question i had with you before. doesn't this allow leaders in the republican party to say to the freedom caucus, to say to lisa murkowski, to say to john mccain, to say to others, hey, you guys vote for us or nancy pelosi is going to write this bill. we can't do anything about it. donald trump's going to go with crashing crash temperature look at three of the president top priorities. tax reform, infrastructure and infrastructure. he could chang the back bill the way some of the other prjs do a
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big infrastructure bill, democrats and labor unions can get on board with and support the nat efforts now, which are pretty robust. he could get all that done by christmas, if he decide that's where he wants to go. make no his take, he will be allen eighting t. >> yerp because ati think this president has proved that so many times over that what's, like, the big news here? >> and as you know, i think
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donald trump probably made a decision sitting across the room. he looked at chuck schumer, he looked at nancy pelosi, let's do the deal. if you listen to people in the white house, they were shocked and surprised. obviously mitch mcconnell and paul ryan were uncomfortable with the way it happened. he just said chuck, nancy, let's do a deal. >> coming up, mabz added a friend during the 2016 campaign. a shadowy russian company with ties to the kremlin? we'll talk to that reporter coming up on "morning joe." in the future, a nation's technology will determine its power. in its economy, in medicine, in science and in national security. one company designs and builds
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so, willie, i'm wondering -- mika, why are you there? i wanted to talk to willie. what time is it? >> 41. >> we're 41 minutes in and we haven't even talked about the big news in the morning. >> what's that? >> the red sox won a game in september. >> and they're up to a four-game lead now. >> we have cy fister now.
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>> excuse me? >> we're calling him cy. i tweeted this out last month, a month ago his e.r.a. was in the -- excuse me? >> when do the yankees make up the game against the orioles? >> today. they'll play two today i believe. >> oh, good. maybe they'll be exhausted and lose. >> we've got news now. >> facebook shedding new light into possible election -- the company reported the group with reported ties to the kremlin had bought roughly 3,000 ads from june of 2015 to this past may. the company went on to say the majority of the ads did not specifically reference one of
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presidential candidate, rather it spread polarizing views on a variety of topics. joining us now, carol, what can you tell us about the group tied to the ad? >> good morning, willie. this group, internet research agency has an incredibly unique name but it's known as a really bad actor. it is based in st. petersburg. it is believed to be financed by close allies of putin and it has for several years been associated with a shadowy, murky effort to push fake facebook accounts, fake twitter accounts and use them to push pro-kremlin
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propaganda. facebook is admitting it did a deep dive, it tried to understand whether any of the ads that were showing up on the site had tent caany tentacles ta and they found that all of them led back to russia. >> that's clearly what they were looking at, was there an aggressive of the by the russians? is your assumption it's much bigger? >> as my former sidekick, you'll know we don't like to use the word assumption, but my sourcing suggests that this is the beginning of just the tip of the iceberg of something much longer. and in fact, we interviewed a former fbi agent yesterday who did a lot of research in this and said that essentially this
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facebook incident, which mostly started in 2015 and stretched all the way through 2016 was almost like a beta test. it was a way for this russian group to use phony robots, if you will, people that weren't really people, to test voters in the u.s. who were susceptible to messaging. so they would check are they sensitive about gun rights, are they sensitive about black lives matter, are they sensitive about lgbt and susceptible who was use. from mark zuckerberg on down, facebook has been extraordinarily defensive, if not secretive? >> well, i think everybody
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company is so they're being careful surely, but they're being more for the coming now than ever. backburg teak a day off of the delete insisting that what you saw were 99% accurate. that came to be proven false. facebook has been doing bit of catch up but i have to give them some credit here. they've essentially said this is what we found. we dug deeper. it's $100,000 in ads. that number may seem small. we're told by experts it had big impacts on an ability to mike barn kls. >> what is the basic ad and is facebook going to releases ad so we can judge for ourselves what
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they were all about? >> very good question. facebook told me yesterday they were not going to released the ads and cited for of these some of them may be sqelo, i guess. that, targets, end zones for pushing out sensitive stories and potentially false stories that were hot button issues for these users. >> thank you very much. >> you better. >> steve robert costa has new
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reporting on that. "morning joe" is coming right back. ♪ ♪ crohn's disease. you're more than just a bathroom disease. you're a life of unpredictable symptoms. crohn's, you've tried to own us. but now it's our turn to take control with stelara® stelara® works differently for adults with moderately to severely active crohn's disease. studies showed relief and remission, with dosing every 8 weeks. stelara® may lower the ability of your immune system to fight infections and may increase your risk of infections and cancer.
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we're going to be announcing something. i would say over the next two or three weeks that will be phenomenal in terms of tax. we'll be reporting back sometime over the next two weeks as to nafta. >> i'll be making a big decision on the paris accord over the next two weeks. >> how long do you think all that will take? >> two weeks. >> really? that's all? >> having a big opening in two weeks. >> any tie idea when you're going to be finished here? >> two weeks. >> we'll have a news conference in about two weeks. >> how long will it take to get this place put together? >> two weeks. >> how long will the job take?
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>> two weeks. >> two weeks? >> you sound like a parakeet there. two weeks, two weeks. >> great flick. >> i haven't seen that one. >> that is a great flick, and we now know where he got his two weeks from. there's always something just right around the corner. >> it's just kind of a nebulous thing. >> it may or may not happen. >> only two weeks away. >> annie didn't sing it quite that way. it was tomorrow. but heidi, there's always better days. there's always sunnier skies. there's always a better deal just around the corner. two weeks away, but actually, what i think everybody is going to be focussed on is donald trump is actually the news breaking overnight. donald trump is going to be having dinner with paul ryan over the next two days. how do you think the republicans are going to respond to all of
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this, and paul ryan specifically. is this when paul ryan finally snaps? >> nope. we've asked that question i think a lot on this show. if anything, he is going to have to come with his hat in hand and try to get an indication of whether this means the president is going to just completely circumvent them and work with democrats or whether this was just a slap on the wrist. notably, joe, last night the reporting suggested that the president also gave a nod and wink to nancy and chuck on daca. so i think he's going to want to just feel this president out. of course, this comes on the heels of the president also taking high profile jobs that both him and mitch mcconnell, this came after his meeting mitch mcconnell which was supposed to be a kiss and make up session. i think this will be more a sense of paul ryan trying to
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read whether this is a real shift or whether this was just a transaction out of frustration and whether the president is going to kind of go back to biasline on tax -- baseline and tax reform and continue to work with his party. >> coming up, senators tick durbin and senator blumenthal. and we are celebrating ten years of "morning joe." oh, my god. >> wow. >> okay. that's something. wow. >> what the heck? i mean -- >> exhausting. >> seriously, ten years? who does that. this is a special anniversary show on tuesday, september 19th. we're going to be live from the historic studio 8 h. you can be part of our live studio audience and watch us get older. go to our website, joe.msnbc.com for details. can you believe this?
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we come into this world needi♪ others. then we are told it's braver to go it alone. ♪ but there is another way to live. ♪ a way that sees the only path to fulfillment- is through others. ♪ welcome back to "morning joe." it is thursday, september 7th. with us we have mike barnicle, mark halperin, alise jordan, and
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robert costa. he's the moderator of washington week on pbs. so politics this hour, president trump waking up this morning with a major deal in hand, joe, and he's working principally on democrats terms to get it done. the president agreed to a plan bringing hurricane harvey relief a three month debt ceiling increase and three month continuing resolution to continue the government going against republican leadership and his own treasury secretary. it gives democrats leverage forcing two debt ceiling popular votes by year end instead of one. inside the oval office republicans argued first for an 18-month debt limit hike until after the debt limit hike. then they offered six months which the democrats panned. steve mnuchin argued in favor of
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a longer debt ceiling limit. mitch mcconnell insisted they also add a three-month government funding bill. here's the president later in the day in north dakota. >> we had a great meeting with chuck schumer, nancy pelosi and the whole republican leadership group. we walked out of there, mitch, and paul, and everybody, kevin, and we walked out and everybody was happy. not too happy, because you can never be too happy, but they were happy enough. >> learning about washington. not everyone can be happy. aboard air force one the president is looking ahead to daca and his new coalition. >> mr. president, what do you say to those who say there are mixed sillagnals over daca?
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>> i believe congress wants to take care of this. even conservative members of congress, i've seen it first-hand. if they don't, we'll see what we're going to do. but i believe congress wants to take care of it. we doesiscussed it today. chuck and nancy and i would like to see something happen. >> you're taking an optimistic view in. >> i think i'm taking a rational view. if you're the president of the united states and you're dealing with people who are self-defeating and people who will not pass legislation without holding the entire process up unless they get 99% of what they want, then you move onto people that you can work with. this morning's wall street journal main editorial talks about the republican gang that can't even shoot straight, and they say part of the republican
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is congressional members put themselves in a box. the majority party has to raise the debt ceiling whether it likes it or not. in all familiar self-defeating fashion, the usual suspects refused. mark meadows and mark walter also claim to be miffed that the debt limit increase won't include spending cut, but the same ones won't vote to raise the borrowing limit no matter what they're offered. this morning we're going to work together to help mark halperin get his pay from nbc, because he says he shouldn't be paid today because he doesn't understand it. as i've been saying from the beginning, this is about math. you have to get to 50 votes in the senate and 218 votes in the house of representatives, 219 votes. if you have a freedom caucus and members in the senate on the republican side that don't get
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you there, you got to go work with democrats. >> my question for you, when are there actually going to be spending cuts? when are we going to stop the train and just stop adding to $20 trillion of debt? it seems like it would have been helpful to have a debate about the budget and about spending cuts this month, but it's just not going to happen, and if we're looking for any kind of fiscal restraint, we aren't going to see it from this president. >> he's a democrat. >> well, you're not going to see it from this president. nobody ever expected that was going to happen, but also you're not going to see it while the united states endures two 1,000-year floods in a two-week time period. i mean, the money that is required for taxes, the money that's going to be required for florida, i mean, i've been part of those processes. it gets really ugly really fast if you don't get them out of the way. they had to get harvey out of
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the way because here comes irma. >> it seems like they could have gotten the harvey funding out of the way without necessarily increasing the budget, making this fight more difficult come december when i feel like republicans are going to be put in a really bad position where they'll have to capitulate to a larger budget than they could have had. while the freedom caucus might be frustrating, it's important. it's important in national security. >> well, and again, just so bob costa just so people listening understand, i'm talking act this in terms of what a president needs to do to get done. i was in the equivalent of the freedom caucus in kocongress. i wouldn't vote debt increases unless there was entitlement
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reform attached. i'm just looking at this from the president's position. he's got nothing done. the republicans haven't been able to deliver. his frustration has grown. they've been promising to take care of obamacare for seven years. they can't even get a majority of votes, so if you're donald trump and you're looking for a deal that actually gets something done, especially after you've been to texas twice, is it a big shock that he went to the democrats? >> it's not, actually a big shock. he ran as a nonideological president. a candidate with hard line positions but who on some of these core issues of spending on medicare, on social security, he never aligned with speaker ryan. and when i was at the capitol last night covering votes, i was really struck by how many republican lawmakers told me privately that maybe they'd been misreading trump more than they imagined. that he was never going to really be interested in boxing out the democrats on these kind of fiscal deals.
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he wasn't looking for a long-term debt ceiling extension. in fact they see the white house as liking this three-month debt ceiling extension because in december it may be the thing when they revisit it that gets daca done and gets daca to the president's desk. this is partly personal in how the decision was made. it comes down to a president who does not think like a republican. he thinks like an independent president navigating the scene. >> bob, speaker -- >> go ahead, joe. >> i was going to say, willie, and again, i think we have to underline this. the president figured out right after the daca announcement from jeff sessions that he was on the wrong side of an 80/20 issue. if the cost of him getting a three-month delay is actually being able to sign a deal that actually turns an executive order about d.r.e.a.m.ers into the law of land, not only does
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he consider that a big win, that's a big win with 80% of the voters. i understand conservatives and hard core conservatives are upset this morning, but, again, i stand alone here. i think politically this is a win for the president. >> and it did sound listening to the sound bite on air force one yesterday, like the president was optimistic that daca would be codified into law. something it sounds like he hope will happen. it's a departure from 36 hours ago when his attorney general announced the rescinding of it. bob, ifg going to ask you about speaker ryan before this deal was struck at the oval office, talked about disgraceful. he talked about ridiculous were words he used describing the potential deal that became the deal that took place. what is -- what does speaker ryan and leader mcconnell do now in terms with their relationship with donald trump. were they genuinely shocked and
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now how do they handle him? >> it's a difficult situation for speaker ryan. he and leader mcconnell are playing multiple chess games at the same time. ryan is trying to keep his own ranks in line. he's being confronted yesterday as i reported by the freedom caucus who remained disgruntled about his own speakership. at the same time, the speaker is being gentle in his interactions with the president trying to get the president to come along with the more traditionally republican view but having limited success in that endeavor. they're both flum moxed on both side of the capitol. how do they move forward and try to get the republican to move forward in a republican way. >> let's ask tom coal of oklahoma. thank you for being on the show this morning. the front page of all the papers, but i'll grab the
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headlines off the wall street journal. trump makes deal on debt irking gop. are you irked? >> i'm sort of thrilled. this is what i've been arguing for. i think the president made the right decision. i think getting the three months buys you the time to deal with the natural disasters right now. i think it also gives you the time to negotiate a larger appropriations bill. today we'll pass all 12 appropriations bills across the floor of the house setting us up in our bargaining position. the senate will have a different one. the administration will have another one. we'll have a three-way deal. i think the president was wise to clear the decks. i was quoted yesterday saying i think a short-term deal is easier to deal with. count me as pleased with what the president did, and i think he's positioned us well as a party and frankly, has positioned the country well to come to a larger deal in noef
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and december that will give us stability for a long stretch of time. >> joe? >> congressman, doesn't it also give you the space to do that? the inbox is massive with harvey, with the debt ceiling, with tax reform. you have irma coming in. a category 5 that's possibly going to hit miami. that's a lot of work for you guys to do, and it seems to me you've got to start getting some things out of the inbox even if that means pushing the debt ceiling fight to the end of the year. >> oh, i couldn't agree more. we're moving a lot of stuff through the house. we've passed over 300 bills. again, we're going to do all our apreaproach bills across the fl. we think the house has been product ive. it's tougher in the senate. we understand their rules structure and the additional burden in terms of confirmation of judges and ambassadors and
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cabinet members. this is not a bad deal in some way. frankly, i think a much worse deal would have been an extended debt ceiling with no spending cuts. we live to fight another day. we take care of what's important today. and harvey is important today. irma will probably be important tomorrow. those things need full attention as we do our regular work. and
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caucus has come a long way. again, we don't have any quite the drama inside the house as people seem to think. i think the speaker is in a secure position. people are pleased with him. he's done a tremendous job. so we're looking forward to working with the administration and with the senate to come to a larger spending deal at the end of the year, and put us on a path of stability and getting tax reform done as well which i think we'll do in partnership with the president. >> congressman, my morning of confusion continues. how is the deal the president made yesterday with the two democratic leaders good for the conservative movement? >> well, it's good for the country, first of all. that's good for the conservative movement and everybody else. we don't need to run out of money in a week or ten days in the middle of a natural disaster. and if people try to use the debt ceiling to score political points, it almost always fails. i tell people look, we haven't
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defaulted on the debt in 240-odd years. the idea that we're imminently going to do it on any given day is ridiculous. the votes are almost always there for a debt ceiling. the combination, does it come from the republican or democratic side, varies on the conditions attached to it. if we haven't defaulted since alexander hamilton, the idea we're going to do it in november of 2017 is pretty farfetched. >> joe? >> congressman, i was one of those guys that unfortunately too often when i was there, i allowed perfect to be the enemy of the good. so i know of what i speak here. does this not send a message to some people in your caucus that you're not going to get perfect, but if you get good, getting a good bill written by a republican is better for them than getting a good bill or a
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bad bill written by nancy pelosi and chuck schumer? that certainly is a recal ality freedom caucus has to face. >> i would hope all members face that. in my view presidents out united states should never be prisoners to any party. dwight eisenhower was good at getting people to work with sensible solutions. the president obviously is aligned predominantly with the republican party, but he needs to be flexible. he needs to be able to reach into both caucuses to get major legislation done. that's a reality particularly in the senate where there's a 60-vote flesh hothreshold. i think this was a declaration by the president of the united states. i think it will serve him and our conference well. again, we're working with him on the budget. we're working with him on a military buildup. i think he's positioned us for a daca solution, and again, that's
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something you have to remember neither president bush more president obama were able to get major immigration reform through the congress. president trump, ironically might be the first guy to do that. so i think there is all kinds of implications to what he did. >> we'll officially put you down as not irked at all. congressman tom cole. >> thank you. >> thank you. great to see you once again. still ahead on "morning joe," don junior heads to capitol hill today to interview with staff of the senate judiciary committee. at least two lawmakers will be there, senator richard blumenthal and tick durbin. congressman adam schiff also investigating russia. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. ♪ we're drowning in information.
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>> the senate judiciary committee will hear from the president's son today. donald trump junior is set to be interviewed by the judiciary staffers today. some senators like democrats richard blumenthal and tick durbin plan to attend. diane feinstein said senators should not take over the interview suggesting their turn will come later. >> we will have a public hearing with mr. trump at an appropriate time. >> reporter: do you know when? will it be this month? >> i do, but i'm not announcing hit. >> reporter: but he's agreed to a public hearing? >> i can't answer that. that would be the chairman's -- so i don't know, but the agreement that we had is that there will be a public hearing, and if they don't come, they'll be subpoenaed.
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>> joining us now, raadam schif of california. he's helping lead the house investigation into russia. i take it you'll be watching what comes out of these interviews today, and what seems most striking to you or what question would you love to hear donald junior answer? >> we'll be looking for whatever information the senate is willing to share. we expect to have don junior come before the committee as well. look, i think the most important questions are going to be what happened before the meeting, during, and after the meeting, and the category of after the meeting what role did the president play in fabricating that statement about what the meeting was all about? of course, that fabrication suggested it was all about adoptions and concealed the fact that the premise of the meeting was to get dirt on hillary clinton that was being offered as part of the russian government to help donald trump. so a lot of the details in the
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meeting will be significant. but what we try to do in these interviews, because we can't always expect the witnesses are going to be fully honest with us, is we try to look for other witnesses that were either present, that were involved in setting up the meetings, that may have relevant documents so we have a way of either corroborating or disproving what we're told about the con tents of this meeting or others. those are the kinds of things i would be looking for and will when he come before our committee. >> congressman, the chair of your committee, the republican chair of your committee, as he recused himself or not? >> he was supposed to have recused himself, said he did or stepped aside, but nonetheless has insisted on continuing to issue subpoenas. in this case, not only subpoenas but letters to the doj threatening to hold the attorney general in contempt. he shouldn't be doing any of this if he's truly stepped aside. we continue to raise this issue
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with the majority. that's an authority that is the subpoena power that should have been delegated to mr. conway in consultation with myself. i find it inexplicable that he tries to exercise this authority. >> so you have a run away chair? >> we do. we're determined to plow ahead and try to ignore the distractions, but it is not helpful to be picking a fight with the doj and the fbi. it also violates the practice of the committee which is we seek voluntary compliance in getting information before we contemplate a subpoena, and here there was no written request let alone bipartisan request that we felt the doj or fbi was stone walling on. so i don't understand the point except i suppose this is an effort by the chair to discredit mr. steel and maybe discredit the fbi in its investigation, but i see little purpose in that if our goal is to get to the truth.
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>> congressman, alise jordan. when do you expect paul manafort to come and meet with your committee? >> what we're trying to do with the principles like manafort and don junior is to make sure we've reviewed all the documents we want to ask the witnesses about and that we have some of the preliminary witnesses come in first. we're not always in control of the timing. but even as a committee because there are other committees that are also bringing in these witnesses, so -- and we also want to try to coordinate not only with each other but with bob mueller. i can't tell you the precise dates. a lot of it should depend on the progress of the investigation. the timing hasn't always worked out that way. >> based on what we know facebook did and any suspicions about what they might have done that we don't know yet, did they put profits ahead of patriotism? >> i don't think we can reach
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that conclusion without knowing more. we'd like to know what facebook was aware of at the time. when they discovered that this was a foreign entity controlled by the kremlin that was buying advertising with an intent to influence our election. so i wouldn't jump to the assumption that this was something they were knowledgeable about in realtime. i do want to know a lot more, and i have a lot more questions in terms of how exhaustive the research was that they did, what assumptions they operated under, why they have reached certain conclusions, what they can tell us about geographic targeting, whether there's a level of sophistication we wouldn't have expected. all of these are just questions and i don't know the answers. but i do appreciate the fact that facebook is doing a deep dive in this. i don't think this is the end of the story, and certainly we need to find out from other social media platforms that we're in communication with whether they've done a similar internal
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analysis and whether the russians used the other platforms as well. >> congressman, good to see you this morning. we've been talking about the relationship and the influence that russia tried to exert on the united states presidential election with the understanding there are things you can't disclose to us on national television, are you more or less convinced today than you were eve an few months ago that the trump campaign had a relationship with the russian government as it tried to influence the election? >> well, clearly there's some relationship here. there are just too many meetings that have been confirmed by the trump organization, and publicly at this point. if you and i had said when we first started talking about this six months or nine months ago that we would find evidence effectively in black and white that the russians through intermediaries approached the top people in the campaign including the president's only son, and offered help derogatory information about hillary
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clinton as part of the russian government to help mr. trump and that the campaign accepted that invitation, you would have said you'll never find that. no one will put that in writing, and yet, that has been found. so we know a lot more. i think the claims that there was no evidence of collusion have long since fallen away. the question now is what is the quantum of proof here. there certainly is vivid public evidence of an intent to work with the russians to receive help from the russians. there's still a lot of questions that we need to answer about the follow through on that. what preceded that. so i'm not ready to make any conclusions, but we know more than we did six or nine months ago. >> from where you sit is intent enough or do you need a direct line between the trump campaign and the russians? >> intent is generally never enough. you have to have some act in concert with the intent, whether it's a conspiracy or some other underlying offense. so no, i don't think intent is
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enough. but, of course, we have not just intent here, and again, talking about the public evidence. you have a consistent and concerted campaign to deny and conceal the truth. just looking at that one meeting and all of the various explanations and false statements surrounding it, it's a pretty good further intention of a knowledge of guilt here. so a lot more work to be done. and i don't want to draw any conclusions at this point, but the fact that there are all of these unexplained contacts, and all this effort to either conceal or mislead about them continues to raise profound questions for our investigation. >> all right. ranking member of the house intel committee congressman adam schiff. thank you very much. >> thank you. >> and coming up on "morning joe," senator richard blumenthal joins us with his take on where the russia investigation stands ahead of his audience with donald trump junior behind closed doors today.
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and south florida bracing for hurricane irma. this is the line at a packed home depot in miami. first thing this morning, we're going to get the latest on irma's track coming up on "morning joe." liberty mutual stood with me when this guy got a flat tire in the middle of the night,
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look what we did on daca the other day. i don't agree with that decision, but i understand how he struggled with it and he's giving a possibility and he said last night in a tweet he would rethink it. the guy's on the far right and the guys on the conservative side are not happy with this. >> can i remind you a good catholic, a cardinal is opposed to what's happening with daca. cardinal. >> the catholic church has been terrible about this. by the way, you know why? because unable to really come to grips with the problems in the church, they need illegal aliens. they need illegal aliens to fill the churches. it's obvious on the face of it. that's what the entire catholic bishop's condemning. they have an economic interest in unlimited immigration, unlimited illegal immigration.
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>> oh, my god. >> so, mike halperin, steve bannon is where steve bannon needs to be. i think for the sake of steve bannon, and for the sake of all of steve bannon's causes, instead of putting him inside a white house bureaucracy, you put him out, and you let him run, and carry your water. it never made sense that they put a suit on this guy. that doesn't work. >> particularly when you surround him with establishment figures, goldman sachs people and an economic council. steve bannon lost a lot of internal fightings. he lost on afghanistan and the tax plan. he was on track to lose on immigration. and as you said, he's now in a place, and that interview is going to get a ton of attention. i understand it was long and interesting. when it airs on 60 minutes, it's
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going to get a ton of takes, because he does have a following among people who are very influential not just with the president but with a lot of members of the house. and so this may lead to forcing the president to pick more starkly than he did yesterday. is he siding with steve bannon or chuck schumer and nancy pelosi. >> he has a lot more influence outside the white house than inside. because donald trump will listen to him on 60 minutes. donald trump will read what he says on breitbart. that's just -- that's just the way it is. if he's inside fighting with 30 other people, then there's the battle, and that gets watered down. if he goes on 60 minutes and is profiled on "60 minutes", then he gets the audience of one that he wants in a way that he didn't get inside the white house. >> and is that a good thing? >> i'm not saying it's a good thing or a bad thing. i'm just laying out what's
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happening in the field here. for steve bannon, being outside of the white house makes him a more effective spokesperson for what he believes in that be even being inside the white house where he was in constant battles with everybody inside the white house. >> joining us now, a member of the armed services and judiciary committees, richard blumenthal of connecticut. senator, thank you for being on the show this morning. >> thank you, mika. >> you're going to be watching donald trump junior during this interview. not participating at all? what are you hoping to hear? >> what i'm hoping to hear is some answers to questions about the june 9th meeting that he attended and helped organize with jared kushner and campaign chairman paul manafort, and two foreign agents who came promising incriminating evidence about hillary clinton. equally important, what happened
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after. who said what to whom then, and what meetings and other potential coordination was there by way of providing information, or in the social media world such as facebook, compromising or coordinating of trump digital operations with the russians, and that really is an area that i think is tremendously important, growingly important. >> senator, it's good to see you this morning. what are the penalties for donald trump junior not telling the truth? what are the rules that you have set around his testimony? >> any individual who lies to a congressional committee is subject to the penalties of 18 united states code, 1001. it punished an individual who fails to tell the truth to government officials in this kind of circumstance. that could be punishable by several years in prison and fines. >> and so inside this meeting
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that donald trump junior accepted with as you call them, foreign agents, attended also by jared kushner and also by paul manafort. based on what you know publicly and privately, what are your worst fears about what may have taken place? >> my worst fears among them are that this meeting may have been a prelude or an overture to more coordinated activities involving collusion between the trump campaign and the russians in their interference and our election and after there was obstruction of justice, which is very much front and center, and involves also following the money. and that's the other area that i think is important in the meeting this morning, following the money that may have involved transactions between the russians and the trump organizations in moscow. the letter of intent to build the major residential complex or trump tower or whatever else was
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contemplated. because the russian play book is to entangle and compromise foreign officials, and in this instance, may have been a reason that the white house wanted to conceal or deny evidence, and may have fired jim comey when the fbi was investigating. >> so, senator, obviously for the audience watching now, he's going to under oath when he testifies. >> he will probably not be put directly under oath in this setting. >> then how can you get him for perjury if he's not under oath? >> because the federal statutes make punishable any untruth in these circumstances as for example happened with poin j poindexter. put aside that issue. he will be testifying under oath
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in public. i have, in effect, demanded it. others on the committee expect it. and have insisted on it. and i think that the chairman who has conducted the hearings in a very impartial, professional, straightforward way, will require donald trump junior to testify in public under oath, and so this meeting is not the final session when donald trump will be answering these questions. >> but help me out here. i'm a rank amateur here. i've only sat and watched trials and watched cross examinations, of course, during the course of my career. given the level of import of this person at this hearing, why is he not under oath? >> well, that's a good question. in this hearing and in this setting, think of it more like a preparation for the trial. much like a deposition where a witness may be asked questions and we can use his answers to
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potentially impeach him when he testifies at the public hearing. in other words, to contradict him. the use of the transcript, and i hope the public disclosure of it, will inform the public and enable us to conduct the hearing more effectively. >> senator, that kind of begs the question, though, why not just go ahead and have a public hearing now? is there really that much that is going to be gleaned from this closed-door session today that is really going to fundamentally change what would be said or done in a public hearing? >> it may, or it may not change what he says in a public hearing. but it enables us to go into the hearing with more and better information to ask questions of him. the question will be at that public hearing, whether he remains consistent. >> but senator bird has said already he doubts anything new will come out of today. do you agree with him?
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>> we'll have to see what comes out of today. i never prejudge what a witness is going to say, and donald trump junior has said various things about that june 9th meeting, about financial dealings, and ultimately the question is what did the president know, and when did he know it? >> senator, when will this process conclude? >> i think it will conclude when we conclude that we've uncovered all of the evidence of potential compromises of the department of justice. it's our oversight responsibility to determine whether there was any kind of wrong doing relating to the department of justice investigation, and we're going to continue working until we uncover all of the evidence that may exist of obstruction of justice, of collusion between the trump campaign and the russians in interfering with this election, and we're determined to get at the truth. >> senator, thank you very much. good to see you.
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>> up next, the president and ivanka trump's father/daughter relationship was on full display while pushing for tax reform yesterday. we'll have that. and we're celebrating ten years of "morning joe" with a special anniversary show on tuesday, september 19th. live from historic studio 8 h. go to our website, joe.msnbcf.cm for details. dad: molly, can you please take out the trash? (sigh)
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show me sports. it's so fluffy! look at that fluffy unicorn! he's so fluffy i'm gonna die! your voice is awesome. the x1 voice remote. xfinity. the future of awesome. welcome back to "morning joe." out just this morning is first women changing the world. it's the newest multimedia project from "time" highlighting 46 women who broke barriers across all fields and joining us now a first of her own. the first woman editor and chief of time magazine, nancy gibbs. what a cool project. where did it come from? >> this has been a year in the
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making. it grew out of conversations we're having how is it we've seen for the past generations girls doing well in school, going to college in greater n b number and then, and they're still not breaking into top leadership levels. we wanted to look at the women in different fields to broke through the glass ceiling. what was it like? what motivated them? what stories do they have to tell. if you can't see it, we can't be it. we heard that over and over and over again from the first woman to walk into space to the first ceo of a major car company of saying that you -- for young men, they have to see what's possible, and they have to hear the stories. that's what we set out to do. >> i love the range. there's names like hillary clinton and oprah winfrey, nancy pelosi, nikki haley, also danica
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patrick, people from sports. you touch a lot of bases here. >> what's so important here is that there can't just be one variety of role model. you need women women who are introverts, extro verts, who are very entrepreneurial and vie and retiring, they dot-com in this very personal way about the obstacles they ran into and what it was that drove them. in some cases they are driven by people who say you can't, you won't, you'll fail. in some cases ellen degeneres said i didn't set out to break a barrier. i do comedy because i love it. we kept hearing joy, i was doing my thing. i wasn't aware i was the first to break through this barrier or to achieve this thing. so every journey is different. i think what was so important is we looked for a really wide
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range of dis palestiniciplines, pitches shut out in the world league series, barbara walters. >> you said one particular story from nikki halle was interesting. can you show that? >> a lot. each woman has these moments n. nikki halle's case, she talks about when she is a little girl in south carolina the child of indian parents, her father wore a turbin, they were different. they entered the little miss bamberg pageant she and her sister. they were disqualified. because we have a white queen and a plaque queen, we don't know where to put you. they said, can she do her talent? she sings this sland my land this land is your land. it's a parable of a story t. idea of putting people if categories or giving tell labels bothered her. she also says she told her
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brother she wanted to be the mayor of bamberg, because that was as high as she can see, women need to see higher to the very, very tops of whatever profession, whatever discipline, area of enterprise. >> she is there now. >> so this list of impressive women, some very prominent. some not so prominent. there is no ranking, no number one, no number five, she's number 12. tell me about the process, how long did you talk about it? how many names did you start with? how did you make the decision to cut it off? >> it was on organic process, we didn't say let's picks i pick 46. we started out saying let's look at a dozen different women, different stories. it grew on its own if a sense, at some point we have to stop and publish. at some point we have to get the project out there. then we can keep building and
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adding to it. we have these extraordinary videos of 25 of the women telling tear stories. we are also putting out a call on all of our social platforms at #she is the first to invite people. tell us your story him tell us the story of a woman in your family t. first who went to college in your community, in your line of sight who you think has a story to tell that will be helpful to other women trying to find their way. as the mother of daughters, i want them to see not one path, fought two or three paths. i want them to see as many different paths to as many different possible destinations as we can show them. >> you sort of anticipated my next question. i have a daughter as well. are you in a position where you broke through at "time" magazine, the first women editor-in-chief. can you tell us why it's so important for young pim to know about all of these women, not ones they heard of, but women if
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different fields. >> because this is a controversial topic. but we focus a lot on external barriers. there are internal barriers, many of these women talked about caution, you know, rita morrow no tal -- moreno, there was a fight to fet over my own passivism. hillary clinton talks about this culture of perfectionism, women feel like if i don't, if i'm not 1,000 percent qualified for the position, women will hold themselves back. even as madeleine albright talks about the importance of women speaking umm. that's what she would teach her students, she talks about going into the first security meeting, 14 men and her. she found herself hesitating. all right. i won't say anything for a while until she gets the lay of the land. she realizes a united states of america plaque in front of her.
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if i don't speak the united states doesn't have a voice in this room. a lot what they talk about are cultural, psychological, they're internalized. you see fit research little girls as young as six talk about thinking boys are smarter tan girls. so, if that's why i think it is really important to have these kind of personal intpat stories told that aren't just about structural barriers to achievement. some of the ones we may incull pate if one another in our children and you know women to other women. so that's what a lot of these people are talking about. i think it's helpful for fwirls to talk about. >> this is a new project. the double issue of "time" is on sale tomorrow and first can be viewed at time.com/first. you will want to check it out. thank you. >> thank you. >> still ahead, more fallout from the president's dealings
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paul ryan furious and according to axios doubts the president even has a strategy. we'll ask the football two democrat dick durbin what he thinks about all of it. we are tracking purpose irma, leaving a path of destruction already, now, south florida is place the i bracing for a big impact. bill karins has the latest track next on "morning joe." . kevin, meet your father. kevin kevin kevin kevin kevin kevin
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and puerto rico and other places, we'll see what happens, we'll know in a very short period of time. but it looks like it could be something that will be not good. believe me, not good. >> all right. good morning. it is thursday, september 7th. welcome to "morning joe" with us we have veteran columnist and ms nbc contributor mark barnacle, ms nbc mark halperin. co-founder of as objection, tim vandhigh, now the politics, seven months into his presidency, donald trump has relearned the art of the deal it seems, but to the shock of republican, it was with democratic leadership, in a landmark oval office meeting t. president agreed to a plan bringing hurricane harvey relief, a three-month debt ceiling increase an three months continuing resolution to fund the government, going against republican leadership and his own treasury signature.
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it gives democrats leverage forcing two unpopular debt ceiling votes by year's end, instead of just one. it all began early in the day t. democrats put out a news release calling for a three-month funding bill, which got an ice yes reception from paul ryan. >> i think that's a ridiculous idea. ehope they don't mean that. let's think about this we got all this devastation in texas. we got another unprecedented hurricane hitting, about to hit florida. and they want to play politics with the debt ceiling. i think that's a ridiculous and disgraceful and to play politics with the debt ceiling like schuker and pelosi are doing, i don't think is a good idea. >> inside the oval office, republicans argued first for an 18-month debt limit hike until after the mid--term elections. then they offered six months, which the democrats panned.
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steve mnuchin argued. the president cut him off, multitell sources with knowledge of the meetings said mitch mcconnell insisted they add a three-month government funding bit. an aide tells nbc news towards the end of the meeting, ivanka trump entered the oval office to say hello, and the meeting careened off topic. republican leaders were said to be visibly annoyed by her presence. a white house aide says the president invited her to the meeting to discuss her child tax credit proposal and it was quick and productive. but by the end of the meetingen agreement had been reached, ben domenic says it is real and spectacular. here's what all sides said afterward. >> we had a great meeting with chuck schumer, nancy pelosi, aed the whole republican leadership group. i tell you what, we walked out of there, mitch and paul and
quote
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everybody, kevin, and we walked out and everybody was happy. not too happy, because you can never be too happy. but they were happy enough. there so, it was a really good moment of some bipartisanship and getting things done, no one standing in their corner. we democrats, you know, some people just don't help at all, particular on debt ceiling. but we thought for the good of the country we should make the right offer. >> the president and the senate and the house democratic leadership agreed to a three-month continuing resolution and a debt ceiling end to december. >> the president decided to extend it for longer-term measures. >> look, the president can spec for himself, but his feeling was, that we needed to come together to not create a picture
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of a divisiveness at a time of genuine national crisis and that was the rationale. >> break down what happened, it feels like a very public in terms of the republicans and what they went through in that meeting yesterday and then the ivanka almost. or is there anything to break down there? >> i mean, there is a lot to break down, you saw donald trump, he was able to do something, he hasn't been able do for the first seven-and-a-half months of his presidency. he was able to go out in front of cameras and say this is what we got done. we've averted a debt crisis where the united states defaults on its debts for another three months. there is a lot of chaos. people said this was going to be bloody. we pushed this off to the end of the year, we also have funded
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hurricane harvey and i'm sure that was a real driver for this final decision, but just look at it. mark halperin, you said it yesterday, donald trump's inbox is massive. he has so much to do. he's looking around the room and looking at mike pence, everybody said mike pence is great on capitol hill. he doesn't know how to work the senate. he was never a senator. then you got paul ryan sitting next to him and mitch mcconnell, who guys that have led the republican caucus said for seven years, when they were in power, they recall going to repeal obamacare. they failed at repealing obamacare. if seven-and-a-half months, they failed at passing a lot of other things and, yes, donald trump helped them spectacularly in failing. but it's like i have been saying all along. you are never going to pass things as long as mark meadows
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and a small faction says it's going to be perfect or we will blow it up. well, anybody that's in the white house says they will blow it up all you want to. we will roll you. i have said for seven month, 40 or 50 democrats. we're going to get the deal done. i mean, he has to get harvey done. he had to get the debt ceiling issue done. he's got another category 5 storming towards miami in south florida. so that's going to be another relief bill he has to get done. he's got all of these other things in front of him. there was no way he was going to get it done with the republicans. so, yes, this is horrible for the conservative movement. this is horrible for the republican party. but it's good for democrats. it's good for donald trump. i guarantee you, most americans like the fact that washington finally got something done yesterday. mark. what say you, mark halperin? >> nbc shoop pay me today,
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because i have no idea what this means and this is about. it's one of the strangest things i've seen in not just in donald trump's time, but for an president. >> see, i'm with you. >> agree, joe, in the short term, fought having a debt skooel ceiling crisis, i agree that's a short-term thing of governing a lot of people like. come december, which is not that far away, if the president has to make a deal on daca, the president has to make a deal on funding the affordable care act, if chuck schumer an fancy pelosi start to make more demand and in all this deal crowds out any possibility of tax reform, i'm not sure politically or substantively come january the president will be in a particularly strong position. >> but, mark, first of all, they can pay me double. yesterday, i said. >> you did. >> so line carnac and by the way, if donald trump, if the
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cost of donald trump getting the debt ceiling taken care of in december is, having a press conference, with 350 ladies and gentlemen lators standing behind him, to do for daca and d.r.e.a.m.ers what barack obama wasn't able to do and have him sign a law, then donald trump will take that deal. listen, this all assumes donald trump's pivot will last longer than 12 hours. i'm sure he will watch "fox and friends" this morning and tweet and destroy any gains he made yesterday afternoon, because they'll be atacking on "frox and friends," probably. but if he sees this through, then, yes, he would love to sign daca and be able to do something barack obama couldn't do and if it's pelosi and schumer, they're with him, what does he care? he doesn't care about the republican party. he never did. >> if he can build a long-term
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coalition that way, agree, a lot of the things he cares about, infrastructure, health care, immigration. he can get a lot done with that coalition, but he's now left for short term, in happiness on the right and can he, is he willing to build a sustained coalition with anger from fox, breitbart, talk radio? i don't know if he s. it's certainly -- >> it's a world of possibly. >> willie geist, a lot of those people were actually apologizing for donald trump and if one of the most spectacular rhetorical twists are blaming this all on paul ryan. i mean, we all saw some clips last night that chuck schumer and nancy pelosi became the height heroes, this was all poor paul ryan's fault. he's a little more upset about this i'm sure than anybody. so that's the thing, willie, trumpers are going to follow donald trump no matter what he does. so if he's doing deals with
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democrats when he needs to do deals with democrats, they'll still be with him. he may pick up one or two people in the middle. >> when you look at that photograph right there we had of schuk cluck schumer and the president of the united states, an incredible photograph, donald trump looks like schumer is jabbing a finger in his face. we know what is happening, trump is with a guy he knows around new york, we did a deal together. there is an ease that the president has with chuck schumer he does not have with mitch mcconnell, that's a fact. if you can imagine sitting in the oval office with secretary steve mnuchin thinking this is a photo op. it will all go one way, having the tables turned on you completely. if you talk to people around the white house, they say, they, too, were surprised by the president's decision in the room. they came out and said the right things on tv. but they were surprised what the president did. this is the man they signed up with. this is a man who makes a deal because he's in the room.
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he likes chuck schumer. he got the headlines if you look at the paper, trump reach ace cross the aisle, another says, trump strikes a deal, this is what donald trump craves. he got a deal done. >> exactly. i think that's exactly what this is. it's just transactionabl, he wa not getting a deal with the republican leadership. it's been devastating in terms of health care and the agenda items he's been unable accomplish. in this case the democrats were able offer him a way out. and i dare to say that i think joe is right that even trumpers are going to like this, because many of them are fought doing what i call the tea party two-step of wanting to kind of drown deposit in the bathtub. they want to see government actually work better. that what this is going to do. even if it puts his party in a bad position, going forward, we will find out whether trump is able to go ahead and cut those
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deals with democrats on daca, it's all up to him. because there's just one thing that could kind of proceed that up, that is whether the president chooses to throw the wall into all of this there is a deal to be had on daca with maybe some minor increases in border security, cutting a deal by the end of the year on daca wouldn't be too hard. the president will decide that, whether he wants to throw the wall into it and proceed things up. >> still ahead on ""morning joe,"" we will get the latest track on irma as the storm heads to the eastern seaboard. facebook tells congress it accepted $100,000 in ad buys from a russian group targeting american voters. now, versions want to know -- >> is that bad? >> it's bad. investigators want to know if people in the u.s. were helping moss gow push propaganda, you are watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. ♪ this is a story about mail and packages.
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♪ let's talk about facebook here, shetding n shedding new l on possible interference in the elections, bogus accounts in russia posted $100,000 adds on the site. the group with reported ties to to kremlin bought ads from 2015 to this past may. they went on to say they did not specifically reference one of the presidential candidates rather spread polarized views and they helped make this story, carol, good morning, what more can you tell us about the group that purchased the ad itself, ties to the kremlin is a loose and vague term, what does that mean here? >> good morning, willie. this group, internet research
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agency is known among researchers in russia and the u.s. and circles as a bad actor. it is based in st. petersburg. it is believed in the intelligence committee to be financed by close allies of putin. it has for several years been associated with a shadowy, murky effort to push fake facebook accounts, fake twitter accounts and use them to push pro-kremlin propaganda. in this instance facebook is admitting it did a deep dive. it tried to understand whether any of the ads that were showing up on its site had some sort of tentacles to russia and what they found is all of them led back to this weird st. petersburg company in russia. >> is your former sidekick here? is your working assumption in reporting this out, there were other groups doing the same
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thing on facebook or platforms, was there a much more aggressive effort? does this buy in and of itself is not that massive, probably will not persuade or move many votes at all. is your assumption much bigger? >> you know we don't like to tuesday word assumption, butpy sourcing sugge -- but my source suggests this is the tip of the iceberg of something much lashlger. in fact, we interviewed a former fbi act yesterday who did a lot of research in this and said essentially this facebook incident, which mostly started in 2015 and stretched all the way through 2016 was almost like a beta test. it was a way for this russian group to use phony robot, if you will, people, that weren't really people to test voters in the u.s. who were susceptible to messaging. so they would check, are they sensitive about gun rights?
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are they sensitive about plaque lives matter? are they sensitive about lbgt and physical out who was susc t susceptible to messaging and use that material to target them with election-oriented adds later. >> from mark zuckerberg on down, facebook has been defensive and secretive, how did they react? did they sound clean or try to protect thels himself? >> well, i think every company is umt ultimately in a defensive posture about any role in which they may have been used by a group connected to the president of russia. so they're being careful, surely. but they're being more forthcoming now than ever. as you know mark zuckerberg insisted 99% of what you saw on facebook was accurate and news stories authentic and real that came to be proven false and
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facebook has been doing a bit of catch up. but i have to give them some credit here. they've essentially said, this is what we found. we dug deeper. it's $100,000 in ads. >> that number may seem staal small wind chill retold experts it had a big impact in impression to use and target voters. >> thank you very much. coming up on ""morning joe,"" senator dick durbin joins the conversation. staffers from his committee interview donald trump jr. today on capitol hill. we get a preview of. that first an update on hurricane irma now barreling across the caribbean with devastating results, bill karins has the latest track next on "morning joe."
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today hurricane irma is expected to graze the dominican republic and haiti before heading towards bahamas and ultimately florida. france's superior minister says the storm left eight people dead and 23 injured on french island territorys, overnight, the hurricane lashed puerto rico with powerful winds and flooding rain, for the latest open the hurricane irma's track, let's bring in nbc meteorologist bill karins.
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bill if good morning to you, mika, still all bad news for south florida. it's taking a track off the coast. the trend is right at south florida as of now. we only have 6660 hours left. it's amazing how strong and how it's maintained the stringt now for two straight day, very rare. it should continue right throughout today. we have hurricane warnings. we will have hurricane watches coming up with that 11:00 a.m. advisory. here's the forecast path. again, the next new path will come out at 11:00 a.m. east coast time. this was the path from 5:00 a.m. look what they did. they had that center line from south to north. right up through southeast florida with the eye possibly gentleman over the top of miami, tlau ft. lauderdale, west palm beach. unless they weaken it down to a cat 4. still, intensity forecasting is not great. it could be a 350r.
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you tend to get a leeway on each side. we think lit head up toward georgia and south carolina. that was as we go through late tuesday night into thursday morning. there are two long range models. this is the european modem. now the usa model is still a little off the coast. typically it's a little more accurate. it doesn't mean it still can't happen. there is some hope we could get a track a little further off the coast. here's our specialized hurricane models. the mountains of cuba will not interrupt with the circulation. then it takes that turn? where this north turn occurs means the world t. difference between 20 and 30 miles will be they of the storm over miami or off the coast to follow these yellow or 14 lines the orangest lines and red lines, the eye is over southeast florida.
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that sliver, a 20 to 30 mile difference, we won't know that turn until saturday afternoon. that's the critical turn we talk about in the next 48 hours. prepare for the worst. we still got our fingers crossed, there is still a little time to get this thing off the coast. new york city, a lot of our friend down to the south. our thoughts are with you. you are watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. in the future,
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>> in a moment we will talk more about this interview with steve bannon, which it's fascinating. we will run a little more of that for you. first the push for health care reform is back on in congress an believe it or fought, there are signs of bipartisanship?
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senate health committee chair lamar alexander says he hopes to shore up insurance markets and keep prices from distracting by the end of next week t. deadline for insurance companies is september 27th. senator patty murray the top democrat on the committee says it won't be easy but that it's possible. it would be the first ever bipartisan bill towards improving the affordable care act. complicateing the effort, however, is a competing bill, now in the works from senators bill cassidy and lindsey graham that would repeal and replace obamacare with brock grants, senior mccain first said he supported the measure, backtracked saying he'd need to first see the final version and the pullout over president trump's plan to end the immigration program phone as daca continues with 15 states and the district of colombia filing suit to block the move t.
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democratic attorney general e attorney generals general who brought on the lawsuit claims the president's plan to ind deportation for young immigrant was motivated against prejudice against mexicans. the ag cited previous statements referring to some as rapists and his decision to pardon former arizona sheriff joe arpaio next month. fresh off the debt ceiling and more, here's what the president said on air force one about impacting young undocumented immigrants. >> reporter: mr. president, what do you say there are smix i mixed signals out of the white house. >> congress i really believe wants to take care of the situation. i really believe it. even very conservative members of congress have soon it first hand. if they don't, we're financial to sigh what we're going to do, i tell you, i really believe congress wants to take care of
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it. we discussed that also today and chuck and nancy would like to see something happen and so do i. >> joining us from april, a member of the senate judiciary committee, dick durbin, good to have you on board, first of all what do you make in the oval office with chuck and nancy? . >> well, i can tell you i thought it was a good step forward the economy will not be stopped, we will provide hurricane relief to houston, texas and the areas that were affected. so it was a good bipartisan step forward. i'm going to vote for it today. >> all right. go ahead, willie. >> for durbin. we want to ask you about the d.r.e.a.m. act. you need 8 to get to the 60 threshold, has that dynamic been changed what the president did, kicking the can over to congress yesterday? >> i think the president can help us. we need his voice in support of a good approach, passing the
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d.r.e.a.m. act in a pi bart sand fashion. i was sad and disappointed and angry with the decision this week to end daca. i thought attorney general session's comments on this were inappropriate and really didn't reflect what the president had been saying over and over, we love the d.r.e.a.m.ers. i want to say next to the sadness i feel for these people affected 780,000 and their families, the overwhelming public sent it's is in support of their cause, that tells me, we have a rare opportunity. i have been at this a long time to pass bipartisan legislation this year. >> we want to show you what steve bannon had to say on that in just a moment. joe, jump in. >> i wanted, senator, do you think it's actually possible to achieve bipartisan immigration reform with donald trump, of all people, is this nixon going to china? >> well, it could be joe. just take a look at, the hard
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statements he made about immigration during the course u course of the campaign. but there was after the election there was always an after the risk when it came to the d.r.e.a.m.ers and data. he said good things about them. he looked at me in the eye the dag of inauguration, we're going to take care of those kids, i want to stand with the president if he is wants to set that goal. i thought it was a setback. i believe we have an opportunity to pass this measure in the house and the senate. >> were you surprised? i'm sure he was. i know i was, a lot of people were. were you surprised how widespread support is for the d.r.e.a.m.ers? you had actually 75% of donald trump's own supporters saying they did not want d.r.e.a.m.ers deported. eight out of ten americans don't want d.r.e.a.m.ers deported. was that even more widespread that even you expected? absolutely. i have to tell you.
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i think what's happened is people have come to know that him. they've heard their stories, they've met them. they feel like these are young people that can make us a better nation. it's coming through on a bipartisan basis. i think my colleagues on the republican side are hearing that as well. we picked up another sponsor, we have four co-sponsoring the d.r.e.a.m. act. we need 60 votes in the senate. we are moving towards that goal. i want to thank lindsey graham my colleague and my compatriot on the effort. the republican senator from south carolina, he has been a stalwart. >> senior, i want to play you a sound byte, charlie rose sat down with steve bannon the former white house chief strategist and dot-com about the context of the clack church. listen and we'll get your ae recollection. >> the catholic church have been terrible about this. the bishops have been terrible about this. you know why? because unable to really to come
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to grips with the problems in the church, they need illegal alien, they need illegal aliens to fill the churches. it's obvious on the face of it. that's the entire catholic bishops condemning. they have an economic interest in unlimited immigration. unlimited illegal immigration. >> so, for, that was response and request from charlie rose, he said essentially cardinal doll an aim came out in support of d.r.e.a.m.ers and daca, that was the response from steve bannon. what's your reaction to that? >> that statement was outrageous. i can say as a check i am proud of my church and many other synagogues, churches, property stapt and catholic alike across the united states have stood up and said this is the moral and just thing to do. mr. bannon of breitbart doesn't get i. he thinks they're doing it for an economic moment.
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he ought to stop for a moment and reflect on what christ said to do, motivating a stranger, what mr. bannon said was an outrage. >> talking about tax reform and the president's actions might lead to a discussion between your party and the white house on tax reform. you know generally what the white house wants currently, how would they have to change their tax plan to potentially get your support to work with the president on tax cuts and tax reform? >> here's what it comes down to, if we are serious about tax reform, we are not talking about tax breaks for the wealthiest people in america. we need tax reform that reaches down to working families and gives them a fighting chance. these working families are falling hein, they're working hard, they're more productive. companies are more profitable. they don't see it in their paycheck. what are we doing with tax reform to help them? secondly, i'd say, have you forgotten about the deficit? when you talk about cutting taxes, at the end of the day, is it going to help or hurt our
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deficit situation? we have to be honest on both levels. >> senator durbin, there are republicans that are concerned about yesterday's agreement with the leaders of your party just because of the potential to, for the deficit to continue unchecked, if there is not some kind of you know cuts in the budget. how do you think that yesterday either helps or harms republicans within it comes to getting cuts to the budget? >> i can tell that you yesterday was not about policy. it was about giving us an opportunity. an opportunity over the next 90 days to come toke on a bipartisan basis. that's how you achieve things in walk. that's what the american people are looking for, we saw the affordable obamacare. it went on for seven wasted months. i left a meeting with lamar alexander and murray, sitting do one governors from both
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political parties, talking about the future of affordable care. that's where we ought to be. we ought to do the same thing when it comes to policy on spending and policy on taxes, let's do this on a bipartisan basis. >> pike. >> senator, i want to go back to the clip we just played, i'm not questioning his faith. i don't know anything about his faith. but i do question his knowledge of the faith and the idea that he insinuates if that clip that the catholic church is interested in daca basically to get more second collections at sunday mass from immigrants. i have been lucky to have been around the world a couple of times. i've seen jesuits if central america and southeast asia. you come from chicago where cardinal burn was a symbol of the catholic church, taking care of the least among us. today chicago is in the grips of nearly daily violence, gun
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violence. yet you have catholic priests, administers and rabbis out there standing in between the violence the every day violence and people's lives, whether it's the violence of poverty or the violence of a handgun. so i want you to expand on your thoughts about what steve bannon in his resentment of nearly everything said that we just heard. >> i can tell you this. i've had my differences with the church on political issues over the years. i am a check. i was raised 19 years catholic education. i don't consider myself an expert or profess to be. but i look to certain leadership, starting with the pope. pope francis set a tone for this church really i feel comfortable w. more and more people are embracing around the world. our cardinal in chicago has been outstanding in the statements he's made. not just about immigration, but gun violence. it goes to the root causes. the poverty and lack of jobs and lack of opportunity and education. i think our church is focusing
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on that. we're not doing it alone, we're standing shoulder to shoulder with bab vp rabbis and protestant minsters and imams and the muslim religion. we believe this can be done across the board, we can bring together a community of faith that supports a positive and progressive view of where we can go as a nation. i'm sure mr. bannon will never get close to that deal. >> senator dick durbin, thank you very much. >> thanks, good to be with you. >> let's go back to a new interview with former white house chief strategist steve bannon. here is what he said about hess public feud with chief economic adviser gary cohn. >> my problem and i told general kelly this, when you side with a man you side with, i was proud to come out and defend president trump in the media that day. >> no exceptions in terms of siding with someone? >> you can tell him, hey, maybe can you do it a better way. if you break, then resign, if are you going to break, resign t. stuff that was leaked out that week by certain members of
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the white house i thought was unacceptable. if you find it unsenable, you should resign. >> who are you talking about? >> i'm talking about obviously gary cohn and other people, if you don't like what he is doing, you don't agree with it, you have an obligation to resign. >> so gary cohn should resign? >> absolutely. >> there are reports suggesting it may be costing him a high profile gig. so let's bring in cnpc sarah eisen live from the new york stock exchange with more on that and other news in business. sar. >> reporter: this is certainly the biggest story for us the mystery building around who the next federal reserve chairman is going to be a. lot of people here in wall street saw gary cohn as the front runner. according to this new "wall street journal" report out today, trump is leaning against picking gary cohn. the report does say, it comes after cohn's criticism of the administration after the
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response to charlottesville. remember when gary cohn gave that interview to the until times saying the administration can and must do better condemning these types of groups, white supremacists, neo-nazis, that may have cost him the top job. so the question is, who is it going to be? janet yellin's term is up in february. she remains a candidate. her chances just shot up. just adding further uncertainties to the big question about what the fed is going to look like next year, stanley fisher the number two vice chairman who is a giant of central banking has taught most of the other central bankers on the world stage surprisingly announced he is stepping down in october a few months before his term is up for personal reasons. no matter how you look at it, president trump is going to have a chance to reshape the federal reserve. with fisher out, there are four vacancies on the fed. she still has to make the big decision, which we hear is going
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to come by the end of the year on who the next fed chairman will be. i will say the market, though, is taking this calmly on the ideas the names out there,ion taylor, the rumored names, they're familiar names to economists and in market circles. nobody out of left field yu yet. we will see, this is a big uncertainty. >> c nbc sarah eisen, up next, a report from russia, why the north koreans are meeting amid word of plans for another possible missile launch. and on tomorrow's show, marriage i chairman soft house freedom caucus, congressman mark meadows of forth carolina, coup it right here on "morning joe." every year we take a girl's trip. remember nashville? kimchi bbq. kimchi bbq. amazing honky tonk?? i can't believe you got us tickets. i did. i didn't pay for anything. you never do. send me what i owe. i've got it. i mean, you did find money to buy those boots.
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( ♪ ) molly: i reprogrammed the robots to do the inspection. it's running much faster now. see? it's amazing, molly. thank you. ( ♪ ) the trump administration's national security team held a classified briefings yesterday for the entire house of representatives and senate about the strategy in north korea. lawmakers say that they discussed various diplomatic solutions, mainly a strategy of applying pressure on china to negotiate an end to pyongyang's nuclear program, pushing for stronger u.n. sanctions, and strengthening the defense systems in japan and south korea. joining us live from halfway around the world in vladisvostok, russia, near the border with north korea, nbc foreign correspondent keir simmons. earlier today, the russians
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welcomed the north korean delegation. how did that go? >> reporter: yeah. this was pretty stunning to us, so much so that we just had to grab our iphones to capture this footage. these are images of the north koreans walking openly here in russia, having met with a russian minister as president putin poses as a peacemaker in this north korean nuclear crisis. the north korean delegation here issuing a statement referring to president trump's fire and fury quote and calling that evidence of plotting by the u.s. against against our republic, meaning north korea. they called the u.s. impotent bandits, ignoring the will of the international community to provide peace and stability on the korean peninsula and saying that north korea simply wants a nuclear deterrence while threatening powerful countermeasures against the u.s. and mika, south korea now
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increasingly believing that north korea will again on saturday fire another nuclear missile test. so these are negotiations openly happening with the north koreans right here while the north koreans continue to threaten. >> nbc's keir simmons, thank you very much. let's bring in now former dod official and former executive director of the dnd commission, a senior fellow at the atlantic counsel. good to have you on board. >> thanks, mika. some are arguing there are two options with north korea. are there only two? >> no. i think the real option is a diplomatic solution. i mean, that's the only way we're going to solve this. this putin thing i think everybody should be thinking about syria. you know, he's clearly trying to again show that russia needs to be at the negotiating table and he's also coming out strongly against regime change. that's where the opportunity lies because at the end of the day, we need a compromise,
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russia and china and north korea on one side, frankly speaking, and the rest of us on the other side. what's the compromise? we say, okay, north korea can continue as a state, the regime can stay in power. we'll have a peace agreement rather than an armistice and in exchange, and this is the tough part, of course, north korea's got to freeze their program, they've got to give us some security guarantees. i think there's actually room for a diplomatic solution. what we don't see from the administration is an articulation, don't see them rallying around various countries to help us with this. instead, vut season gladimir pu getting all the attention. >> joe? >> evelyn, we've tried this, and tried since 1994. every deal that we entered into was verifiable. the north koreans lied time and time again. the bush administration caught him lying in the early 2000s. the obama administration
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couldn't figure otut a way to crack the code. we've had democrats and republicans alike try and fail to contain north korea. the next failure that happens allows north korea to finish a program that could kill 5 million people in los angeles in the middle of the night. >> right. >> is that a risk we can afford to take? >> no, it's not, joe. we need to get serious. but i think what could be different this time as opposed to the last time under clinton and then also you should president george w. bush and i was on the hill during this time period watching all of this, i went to north korea in 2008 after the bush administration actually succeeded in using sanctions to bring the north koreans back to the table, although admittedly as you said they let them walk away over the cheating issue. the difference this time could be that we would apply all of these tools together. we wouldn't lift the sanctions. so the george w. bush administration, they confronted the north koreans, they let them walk away from the table so the
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agreed framework that the clinton administration had put in place that had lasted eight years fell apart. >> but evelyn -- >> they lifted the sanctions. >> hold on. >> sure. yeah. >> so what happened, barack obama was president for eight years. >> well -- >> george w. bush was president for eight years. bill clinton president for eight years. all three of these presidents, republicans and democrats alike, failed. >> right. so let's learn. >> what happened during barack obama's eight years? >> there i think president obama was sick and tired of the -- put the pressure on, bribe them to come back to the table as soon as they got the bribery goods, you know, they would walk away, and we had a bad dynamic in place, and the administration decided to just, you know, exercise strategic patience, hoping something would change. now, there are also some differences with regard to the current government, this young leader. he's not like his father. he is -- we see lots of signs he is interested in some market reform, some privatization.
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there have been more efforts under way under his relatively new government. that's also an opportunity. we get the chinese not only to put pressure on them but helping them with their economic reform. >> for a nation we're looking at the leader that craves international respect and wants to be viewed as player on the world stage. >> which one? >> well, north korea. north korea. so what would dee for him from continuing his program? in other words, it's real lu all he's got. he doesn't have an economy to speak of. he's starving people, the electricity, we know the story. why would he stop if this is the one thing that's putting him on the map? >> so, we don't know, no guarantee this will work, but the only hope we have is the fact he wants to stay in power. he is using this nuclear weapon as a hedge against us, basically to say don't you dare try to change my government, don't you dare try to kick me out, and
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down don't you dare try to e eliminate north korea by forcing the north and south korea. that's still on the books. we don't have a peace agreement between north and south korea or between us and north korea. and actually it was a u.n. sanctioned war that we had in the '50s. so there are open questions about the legitimacy, the international community accepting his government. >> would the jap neetz and the south koreans like your plan? i think they would. i mean, the south koreans of course would be ambivalent about it because their formal objective is reunification. of course under a democratic government, which wouk they think based in seoul. but i think that they would. they would at least for a while put up with the status quo. south koreans and the korean government has a good thing going so they don't want a war and don't want refugee flows either. in that sense, they're a little more closely ae luned with china in some ways. >> evelyn, thank you. >> thanks, evelyn. >> thanks, guys.
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>> fin iishing the show today, joe, final thoughts this morning. put it all ogtogether. >> donald trump did what was best for donald trump, what was best for the democrats and i dare say what a lot of americans have been wanting to see for some time, and that is republicans and democrats working together. e this is all going to be eclipsed out of the news of north korea. i find ut hard that donald trump will be able to do what barack obama and george w. bush and bill clinton were not able to do, do, and that is get an agreement with north korea that is enforceable. too much is at stake including the lives of millions and millions of people from los angeles up to seattle, san diego up to seattle. and so there are some tough decisions ahead of us, but we're going to be talking about north korea soon enough, and the news may not be good. >> and mark halperin, willie and
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elise, mark, are you on the politics of yesterday still not getting paid today? >> no, i'm not. >> i'm with you. >> spend on candy and beer. >> willie? >> i've been working pro bono for ten years. >> ladies. >> democratic president. looks like we're seeing the shift happen in real time. >> shift? we knew that. >> of course. >> that does it for us this morning. stephanie ruhle picks up the coverage right now. >> i love it. mika hit willie with a "know your value." i'm stephanie ruhle with a lot to cover starting with 1 million people in the dark. hurricane irma barreling through the caribbean and keeping up its steady path toward florida. >> we boarded up the house and we're hoping for the best. it that's all we can do right now. >> and it's question time. donald trump jr. headed to capitol hill to talk with the senate judiciary committee. you know what about. it's that meeting he had with the russian lawyer at trump tower last june. >>

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